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Andrea

948 days ago
Unfiled. Edited by Xue , Andrea , Elizabeth , Natia 948 days ago
Main video:
Introduction
Elizabeth undefined Panic culture 
0:00:05.7
This question is huge. I started comparing it to global warning, its something we have to address right now, and we cannot put it under the carpet. Things are hanging so fast. I was thinking with a friend, that was talking about Japan, we are being them by ten years everyone has this, technology, they are all technologically savvy, they no longer have these smart phones or iPhones, now they have it on their glasses, on their watches. They are so hooked up. The kids at school are bored because who could compete with technology?
 
I asked a fellow teacher, he was a phished teacher and he remembers when he was first involved with technology, when it was these huge computers, it was only like 30 years, so much has happened.
I spoke with my students, they are like 10 and they recall when they were5 or 6 when they first got a computer. They talked about their brothers and sisters. One of the little brothers, so addicted, they cannot take it away fro them this kid, he had a temper tantrum.
 
 
 
Andrea 1 - INTRO
What's popular? Ipads computers tv 
 
 
Natia Sandra: 
 
Janice: 09 min - kid with no technologies at home still manage to learn from others who have it.. they still manage to interact with technology... to engage ...
 
 
Andrea 2- USES
How is technology helping your child?What are they doing?
 
Xue Janice: .... there is no denying everyone will agree when children around age 2 and so on begin to puzzle it really increases their development and their cognitive skills and reading writing all about is included in all these apps, are inclusive .... let's get to the basics.. We learn a lot how do we learn ABC, how we learn anything we see happen again and again and then we know it... So using this technology children have become really adapt to many many different skills and it is absolutely amazing but again it is important like you said, at some point that there is a very balance... in other sense it take over and then you will be spending too much time in front of the screen and not getting enough fresh air.... 
 
Isabelle: Not the reading that we were exposed to. Even like 10 years ago. It is quick reading. It is immediate gratification. They no longer have to be going to the library they could just go to their ipads.
 
-Empower
Ashley Catherine:
01:26
Pour les tablettes, qu'est qui est bien c'est que tu va avoir le pictogram sur la tablette et ci l'enfant appuit sur le pictogram..ca dits le mot, donc l'enfant tranquillement va faire des associations entres les images at les mots. Graduellement il va pouvoir developer ses cognisances linguistic... lui-meme peut arriver a faire des demandes pour reponds a ses besoins par la tablette electronique.  
 
01:55  
“Je veux”,  la il va appuier si il veut boire, il va prendre le pictogram pour boire par exemple.  Si il a envit aller a la salle de bain. Il va developper un grand autonomie aussi.  Ils vont etre capables... Son plus grandes difficulte c'est sont pas capables a dire qu'est qu'ils veulent. Souvent ca pourrais ____ des crises ou des desorganizations parce qu'il comprends pas.  avec la tablette ils sont reussi a etre en contact avec leurs parents et professeurs.
02:57(this part also posted in Q3)
Social interactions too. We often use social scenarios with them, for example to go to the dentist, it will often be situations that are unknown, out of their usual ritual or habit.  It's a little story that explains...When I go to the dentist, I will sit in the chair and the dentist will then play in my mouth.  To learn how to act in certain social situations.  To learn to take the bus, interacting with someone.
What should I do when someone says hi?   I don't necessarily know that I should say hello.
They will be little stories that explain.  When they say hi, I should say hi in return and ask how are you? Etc.
 
Melanie: and I find that it gives them time to like share with their friends; and because they are excited to see their friends do it they take their turns they share they problem solve. Matching colours, counting, I find that it makes them think more, its gets them the colourful colors they get rewards at the end like if they match the right way they say "great job" or "high five" you can see the excitement in them from being able to do it.
 
 
Xue Entertainment help or hinder?
Elizabeth undefined rose 0:00:10.7 I don’t think that it is helping them in any type of different type of way. I think it is more used to help me to distract them and basically I use it in moderation but I don’t think it’s actually developing any differently if they didn’t have the technology.
 
 Patricia 0:02:49.4- Their only a loud to use it once their chores are done and even at that we often try to keep them busy, we try not to make that a place for them to find leisure. it really usually like a last resort thing, I mean it’s a rainy day, there’s nothing to do the child is really bored, there is nothing on TV she will get have an hour on her Ipad. But, other than that it’s really not given to her. She really has to think about it once in a blue moon and ask for it then we give it to her.
 
Andrea Catherine:
06:16 
Sometimes the transition from one activity to another: taking the bus to go somewhere can be really (disturbing?) because they don't necessarily know what's coming. Music sometimes helps students who have more difficulty with transitions, it's a way for them to feel (regulated?) 
 
 
 
INTEGRATION
 
  • School Setting
 
Xue Melanie... 0:02:08.1- No, we do integrate it in purpose we have computer twice a week, Tuesday and Thursdays, between the 3 to 5 year olds. The younger ones we do sometimes integrate they have a tablet that goes around the daycare that the kids share and there's different educational activities on it and there are also some also like videos of like numbers and counting and songs. But it’s really more towards the 3 to 5 year olds that we purposely integrate it.
Natia janice: 11 min -  Teachers facilitate but not parents in terms of using technology ...  the parents do not recognize that there are so many more in so many other site, so many other means of interaction that the kid can benefit from besides the games...
 
 
Elizabeth undefined Aline: 0:02:55.6
No actually it was integrated by the school. The school sent the school a letter and I looked at it myself and I went ahead and let my son use it. 
0:03:56.6
I did not allow them to be......I just let her jump into it. I introduced it to her myself. Because I thought it would built her knowledge. An also I notice there is a bit of good and a bit of bad, to tell you the truth. As a parent we have to be on our Ps and our Qs. We have to set boundaries. So I mean I do feel bad and in a way I don’t. 
 
Ashley Catherine:
02:57
Social interactions too. We often use social scenarios with them, for example to go to the dentist, it will often be situations that are unknown, out of their usual ritual or habit.  It's a little story that explains...When I go to the dentist, I will sit in the chair and the dentist will then play in my mouth.  To learn how to act in certain social situations.  To learn to take the bus, interacting with someone.
What should I do when someone says hi?   I don't necessarily know that I should say hello.
They will be little stories that explain.  When they say hi, I should say hi in return and ask how are you? Etc.
 
07:47
The diagnosis isn't done before 2 and a half, 3 years old because before that it could just be seen as developmental delays.  There's a lot to consider before telling someone their child falls on the autistic spectrum.  If you see that your child has trouble at the level of language, basic intervention, that's where if your child needs to learn language and is very stimulated (by the tablet?) then it can be helpful even before a diagnosis.  Seeing an image of a dog, you press on it and it says “dog” They can learn the verbal category of the images.
 
08:48
Lots of things to consider: the age, capacity of the child.... lots of elements to consider.  The child could be 12 yeas old, but have the mental capacities of a child much younger.  Often we have specialists to refer them to...
 
  • Home setting 
 
Natia Sandra: So how is it integrated whether it is purposeful and planned? I do not think it is purposeful, No. I do not think parents sit around and say Okay, this will be a good program for my child... 
 
Sandra: ... So there is not that critical media literacy approach, where you say let's watch of the kids discuss gender, race representations....  I think there is too much variability in family for me to be able to say: yes, there is one. Certainly, there will be socio-economic divisions where those who are more educated with more money are going to more picky and openly media-literate with their kids, or keep them away while others say "stay here and watch". 
 
Xue luis: I usually integrate it. I make sure they know how to use technology.
 
They said when they first introduced to the computer when they were 5 or 6. It started first with the computer; they saw their parents using it. They could not wait to get their hands on it. They were allowed to play with the games. One of them was so interested, that he learnt to read, just because he wanted to do what he saw his mother do, learn to read, learn to write. At a very young age, they were already hooked up with spelling games, reading techniques. One of my friends has little nieces, these nieces use technology at 5 years old, the games, the parents use it as baby sitters, unfortunately, at family gatherings, after eating, yes they are very difficult, they go into the other room and they play their games, just to keep them quiet. They also have special films they want them to watch. They have their special games, their cartoon, they have ipads but it is locked and it is limited use. 
 
  • Mind the gap
 
isabelle:
I heard on CBC just this week Elizabeth, concerns of the parents and technology, and there are private companies that are servicing themselves. I know like our huge boards, a few schools have gotten this company to come in and teach the technological savvy to the kids and the teachers. The kids need special courses. Some schools have special courses. Maybe Leaster P peason school board is starting to do this. I am not sure. 
Ecole international has everyone with a tablet, but not all schools are plugged in.
0:07:21.3
As far as I am concerned it is not integrated. It should be but it is not
 
Isabelle in reference to a teachers perspective 0:08:42.7
It’s a huge responsibility; kids are going to need it, for their future, because all the jobs are demanding this. It makes me sad, I picture a scene with a kid comes in the classroom, kids are sitting at their own desk, hocked on, the scene are everywhere and they are learning what ever they want. And they are fascinated and learning, but there is no interaction between the different students. Perhaps they are interacting with forming their ideas on chat rooms or blogs, they are just typing it in, a responding to each other.
...
948 days ago
Unfiled. Edited by Andrea 948 days ago
Andrea Apps for kids - updated
 
This is for the web team. It is also at basecamp Ashley, Kristina Bellows, Xue, Junesse
 
 
Language, math, thinking:
 
1 - Bugs and Buttons 2
 
 
"In BUGS AND BUTTONS 2, kids can choose a specific game from the available activities or progress through the games automatically. Games cover such skills as counting, letter recognition, matching, sorting, listening, following directions, and developing fine motor skills"
 
 
2- iTrace - handwriting for kids
 
 
"Kids can practice tracing uppercase and lowercase letters, numbers, their own names, and words with iTrace. Kids also can learn letter names (not phonetic pronunciations) and word recognition for more than 500 words."
 
 
 
3- Splash Math Kindergarten App - 
 
 
"Splash Math Kindergarten is a highly customizable math app for preschool and kindergarten kids. The skills covered align with Common Core Standards for kindergarten math, and parents can customize the skills kids will practice, see reports of kids' progress, set learning goals, and get email or push reminders for kids to do daily math practice"
 
 
 
 
Self-direction:
 
4- FTVS HD - multisensory scheduling for all kids.
 
 
"Kids will use and follow schedules created by, or with, their parents to successfully and independently navigate various parts of their day. Kids with various disabilities will benefit from the multisensory approach as they hear or see instructions as well as read them and check each step as they move through a sequence."
 
5- Daniel Tiger's Grr-ific Feelings
 
 
"Kids can learn vocabulary related to emotions, how to express feelings in healthy ways, and how to identify what other people are feeling, too, on Daniel Tiger's Grr-ific Feelings. Through the drawing easel, kids can learn that expressing their feelings through artwork is another option for processing and sharing feelings. The photo booth helps kids notice what a feeling typically looks like on someone else's face as well as on their own, increasing social-emotional awareness and empathy. By practicing an easy deep-breathing exercise, kids can learn to handle stress and reduce anger physically. As kids watch Daniel handle situations in the song videos, they may learn strategies to control their own behavior in healthy ways." 
 
 
6 - iTouchiLearn Life Skills: Morning Routines for Preschool Kids
  
 
"Kids can learn to think about their own routines and to get ready for school more independently. The app breaks down the morning routine step by step. Instead of having parents rush kids along in the morning, kids can follow the examples given in the app and get going on their own."
 
 
 
Creativity: 
 
7 - MyPlay Chef Lite - Free cooking app 
 
 
"Kids can learn to follow steps to create four foods. They add ingredients and do a few interactive extras: stir batter by twirling a finger, tilt the screen to flip a pancake, tap blueberries on top in fun patterns, and more."
 
 
 
8 - Toontastic - multi-scene cartoons with musical scores.
 
 
"Kids choose the characters and setting for each scene, then just move the pieces around like they were playing with action figures, providing their own dialogue as the iPad records it all. They can then add a musical score with the appropriate emotional tone."
 
 
 
9- Toca Tea Party - Transform iPad into a tea table with cute, imaginative app.
 
 
"Kids can learn to engage their imaginations as well as practice table manners and social skills while playing Toca Tea Party. As they make choices for what items to include on the table and which food and drink to serve, kids exercise decision-making: "What do I think makes a good party?" Each planning choice shows social respect for their guests. Toca Tea Party is a sweet pretend-play app that extends screen play into real life and helps kids build their imaginations."
 
 
 
 10- Avokiddo Emotions -- Playful learning for kids
 
 
"Kids can learn about identifying emotions through facial expressions and reaction to stimuli in this creative app. Kids are encouraged to use their imagination to make new creative scenes by using props to dress and interact with three friendly, zany animal characters. By playing Avokiddo Emotions, kids engage in lots of silly fun while exploring emotional and creative development."
 
 
 
...
954 days ago
Unfiled. Edited by Andrea 954 days ago
Andrea Interview 
 
"The mobile app world is changing constantly, as are learning theories around them. For more context on the Cooney Center’s study “Is There an App for That?” here’s my Q&A with Dr. Michael Levine, executive director of the Center, Dr. Cynthia Chiong, the report’s lead author, and co-author Carly Shuler."
 
How does this report change the thinking around mobile learning apps?
Before the report, we thought of the mobile device as simply another platform for educational applications, only more mobile. But we discovered that the unique affordances of the mobile device is actually going to shift how technology is used in educational settings. This breakthrough has potential to address long standing concerns with young children using media. 1) The average session is short – this calls for a different kind of application. Kids probably aren’t going to watch a 30-minute show on a phone or spend an hour playing a game like they might on a computer or video game console. This may help to allay concerns of too much screen time for kids. 2) The touch screen allows for more active involvement. This can help to address concerns of passive learning (like watching a show).
Should parents feel guilty about allowing their kids to use their mobile phones for games?
No. Kids see their parents using mobile phones all the time. It is only natural for them to want to use them too. And from the data in our study it looks like many parents are letting their children use them responsibly – with restrictions and in moderation. We recommend a balanced media diet that consists of content that is fun, educational, and doesn’t take up too much time in a given day. 
However there is reason to worry that such vigilance will erode over time and we would be quite concerned if young children, especially preschoolers began to dramatically increase their mobile screen time.
Based on the design principles the study lists, are there any mobile apps you’d recommend to parents now, even if they’re not fully “there” yet? The study mentionsMartha Speaks and Superwhy, but any others that might not be PBS-related?
There are dozens of fun and educational new app’s for elementary age children. Two that we have looked at closely are Project NOAH, a citizen science app that allows children to collect real time data on their favorite animals, flowers and other organisms. A second one is Motion Math, which teaches fractions to children.
Were you surprised at the finding in the study that “there is reason to believe that children currently may not play with an app for long enough to learn much”?
Not surprising at all. Researchers and designers are just at the beginning of their work on mobile apps and there isn’t yet an established “mobile theory of learning.” The shortened sessions we observed will probably be an important factor for designing educational apps. It’s especially not surprising when you think about the context that children are most often playing with apps – in the car and on the go.
What are the most important factors of a great educational app?
At least for right now, mobile apps are meant as supplemental and informal – so make it fun! We also value the intergenerational potential for the apps to help start rich conversations among adults and their children. They should be based on pedagogy and we should continue to do more research in the area.
Why is adaptive technology important in these apps? Are you seeing any encouraging products in the market that truly qualify as such?
The shortened sessions we observed will probably be an important factor for designing educational apps.
Students learn and progress at different paces. It is important to be able to target specific skills at an individual level. Adaptive technology makes it easier to pinpoint those specific skills and also monitor individual student progress. Thus, adaptive technology is often seen in relation to assessment measures. The leader in creating adaptive mobile learning tools in classrooms for young children is Wireless Generation. Another group well worth watching is the work of theTeacher Mate technology.
How can parents differentiate between legitimate educational apps and those that just claim they are?
This is a significant gap in this rapidly emerging field, and one of the main recommendations that our report makes: App developers’ claims of educational impact are largely unsubstantiated and should be based on specific evidence. Parents need more information from consumer groups and educators on how mobile devices can and should be used as learning tools.
1) Go to trusted sources–groups such as Common Sense Media and Children’s Technology Revieware establishing criteria to judge just how effective, age appropriate and well-designed apps are.
2) Most products that have research backing the content will have those research studies available on their website.
How can the educational community make sure that kids from under-served communities have the same access to these educational materials?
We know that the average smart phone buyer – at least for iphones – is skewed towards higher income individuals. But reports still show that more lower income families own a new smart phone than a new computer. Smart phones are cheaper. Perhaps smart phones are a good way to start bridging that gap.
Ideally, these devices will begin to get integrated into the education system through public funding and other grants, taking the expense away from the consumer. However, at this point examples of such are few and far between.
 
 
ps: mind-shift has so many interesting articles in general :)
 
 
953 days ago
Unfiled. Edited by Andrea 953 days ago
Andrea Website
Can we continue to post randomly here? I came across this website and it turns out they have a category about kids and technology...
 
 
 
959 days ago
Unfiled. Edited by Andrea 959 days ago
Andrea  I have a list of 15, but before sorting it, I would like to discuss them with you in class:
 
1 - Bugs and Buttons 2
On-target intro to critical thinking, math, and prereading.
 
 
 
 
2- iTrace - handwriting for kids
 
 
 
 
3- FTVS HD - First Then Visual Schedule HD (?)
Excellent multisensory scheduling for all kids.
 
 
 
 
 
4- Virtual Manipulatives!
Kids get hands on with fractions; guidance needed at first.
 
 
 
 
 
5- WYNN (WYNN Wizard and WYNN Reader)
Gives kids tools to read, write, and comprehend any text.
 
 
 
6- MyPlay Chef Lite
Free cooking app with some fun interactive moments.
 
Kids can learn to follow steps to create four foods. They add ingredients and do a few interactive extras: stir batter by twirling a finger, tilt the screen to flip a pancake, tap blueberries on top in fun patterns, and more
 
 
 
7- Splash Math Kindergarten App - Children Learn Basic Concepts
 
Parents need to know that Splash Math Kindergarten is a highly customizable math app for preschool and kindergarten kids. The skills covered align with Common Core Standards for kindergarten math, and parents can customize the skills kids will practice, see reports of kids' progress, set learning goals, and get email or push reminders for kids to do daily math practice.
 
 
8 - Kidzworld
Well-monitored site where kids uphold community standards.
 
KIDZWORLD is basically an online social network where kids can communicate in a presumably safe environment. (The privacy policy pledges the utmost safety and protection of personal information, and there are strict chat rules.) After the free registration process -- during which parents are notified of the child's intent to join -- kids can create a profile, chat, post messages to other members, send emails or e-cards, post articles or personal writings, upload photos or videos, play games, and enter contests. They can also read news and reviews, blogs, an advice column (to which they can also post a question), and short articles about health, personal style, and project ideas.
Kids can learn important social skills presented on Social Adventures in seven areas: Initiating social contact; maintaining conversations; advocating and compromising; getting regulated; interpreting non-verbal skills; negotiating space; and experiencing humor. For example, under the "advocating and compromising" category, kids can learn how to politely say "no" to a friend's idea. Kids will also practice following directions, listening skills, self-awareness, making wise decisions, and more. Social Adventures can be a powerful tool to help kids become more comfortable socially through simple lessons and fun games.
 
 
 
9 - Toontastic
Create amazing multi-scene cartoons with musical scores.
 
 
 
 
10- Toca Tea Party
Transform iPad into a tea table with cute, imaginative app.
 
Kids can learn to engage their imaginations as well as practice table manners and social skills while playing Toca Tea Party. As they make choices for what items to include on the table and which food and drink to serve, kids exercise decision-making: "What do I think makes a good party?" Each planning choice shows social respect for their guests. If parents faciliate further exploration, kids also can practice shape recognition and counting various groups of cakes, cups, and more on this creative app. Toca Tea Party is a sweet pretend-play app that extends screen play into real life and helps kids build their imaginations.
 
 
 
 
11 - Daniel Tiger's Grr-ific Feelings
 
 
 
Kids can learn vocabulary related to emotions, how to express feelings in healthy ways, and how to identify what other people are feeling, too, on Daniel Tiger's Grr-ific Feelings. Through the drawing easel, kids can learn that expressing their feelings through artwork is another option for processing and sharing feelings. The photo booth helps kids notice what a feeling typically looks like on someone else's face as well as on their own, increasing social-emotional awareness and empathy. By practicing an easy deep-breathing exercise, kids can learn to handle stress and reduce anger physically. As kids watch Daniel handle situations in the song videos, they may learn strategies to control their own behavior in healthy ways. Daniel Tiger's Grr-ific Feelings can be an excellent tool to help kids grow in emotional awareness and expression.
 
 
 12- Avokiddo Emotions -- Playful learning for kids
 
 
...
964 days ago
Unfiled. Edited by Andrea 964 days ago
Andrea Understood project
 
This project was created to help children with learning and attention issues. I found it when I was researching how technology could help kids, and it is so well done, that I found it worth to share. They have a series of videos and activities, including the child's point of view and experts clarification.
 
 
It has resources we could use, but the videos are quite well done too. :)
 
967 days ago
Unfiled. Edited by Andrea 967 days ago
1 - Very low ability (beginner) 5 - Very high ability (Expert)
 
-iPod Touch 
Andrea -Ipad/ Tablet (?)
 
(Less than 6 months), 6-11 months, 1 year, 2 years, 3 years, 4 years, 5 years, Don’t know, Has never done this) - (can we create a table for this? it would be easier to select, I guess)
 
(Less than 1 hour, 1-2 hours, 3-4 hours, More than 4 hours, Never) - (table again?)
 

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